nativeamericannews:

Now, one day after Earth-Maker shaped the world, Iioi, our Elder Brother was sitting and watching the children play. He saw the joy and the youthfulness they displayed. Read more the Legend of How the Butterflies came to be http://bit.ly/19vig6k

nativeamericannews:

Now, one day after Earth-Maker shaped the world, Iioi, our Elder Brother was sitting and watching the children play. He saw the joy and the youthfulness they displayed. Read more the Legend of How the Butterflies came to be http://bit.ly/19vig6k

I Know I Have Whined About This A Lot...

gailsimone:

So forgive me, I promise there’s a weird point to it.

Many of you may remember my beloved rescued racer greyhound, ‘Scuro, had to be put to sleep a couple weeks ago. I know everyone has been through this, and we have all felt the grief. I know people have serious problems and this may seem…

"

Disabled characters are written into stories for one reason: the disability. Do most people actually believe real disabled people spend our days obsessing about being cured? Or rhapsodizing about killing ourselves? Here is the truth: Disabled people barely ever even think about our disabilities. When we do think about them, it’s usually because we are dealing with an oppressive, systemic problem, such as employment discrimination. Can’t there ever be a disabled character in a book or film just because? Where the topic doesn’t ever come up? All sorts of interesting stories can be written about a disabled character, without the disability ever being mentioned. You know, just like real people.

The vast majority of writers who have used disabled characters in their work are not people with disabilities themselves. Because disabled people have been peripheral for centuries, we’ve been shut out of the artistic process since the beginning. As a result, the disabled characters we’re presented with usually fit one or more of the following stereotypes: Victim, Villain, Inspiration, Monster. And the disabled character’s storyline is generally resolved in one of a few ways: Cure, Death, Institutionalization.

"

Susan Nussbaum, Disabled Characters in Fiction (via kassapti)

I know of a disabled woman who, in a writing class, wrote a disabled character into her story.  The rest of the class spent all day trying to determine what her character’s disability “symbolized”, and refused to believe her when she said the character just had a disability, she wasn’t there for some grand purpose.

(via youneedacat)

(Source: worn-whorehouse-stairs, via fatbodypolitics)

retrogasm:

Hippity Hoppity Easter’s on its way…

retrogasm:

Hippity Hoppity Easter’s on its way…

(via true-grit-with-lightskin)

scifi-fantasy-horror:

The Machine by ~Crazymic on deviantART

scifi-fantasy-horror:

The Machine by ~Crazymic on deviantART

(via true-grit-with-lightskin)

ahnka:

good lord. have mercy.

ahnka:

good lord. have mercy.

(Source: fusionkelvar, via black-culture)